Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt: the movie

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Robin put together a movie called “How to Build a Yurt in About Five Minutes.” You can view it by clicking here!

If you’re intrigued yet need more information, you can also buy the book in either color or black and white. It’s 176 pages of step-by-step instructions with lots of photos and drawings, and also includes a materials list for a 16-foot yurt:

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Here’s the link to the color version of the book.

Here’s the link to the black and white version of the book.

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Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. VII: The Book Proof!

Proof

We received the first proof of our book today! A random page opening revealed some of the details for the wall panel jig. There are 170+ pages of everything you’ll need to know to build and assemble a wood-framed panelized yurt.

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There are a couple of drawings to finalize, and a few photos with explanations to add regarding final details, along with some additions and corrections to do. Then we’ll release the book to the world via Amazon.com.

ThreeYaketeers

Meanwhile, here are the Three Yaketeers, with Jeep the supervisor. “Another job, well done.” — Mr. Natural

 

 

Making a Quick and Simple “Stop” for Multiple Cuts

When I’m cutting a lot of boards the same length and angle, it doesn’t make sense to measure each time, or mark multiple cuts along a single board. Employing a block stop system is not only efficient, it also allows the boss to set up a cut and turn someone loose on the task who knows how to safely run the saw and won’t have to worry about careful measuring.

quickstop1Use scrap wood – 2 pieces of 2x material + a piece of 3/4” material (plus whatever needed) to create a support base that is at the same level as the cutoff saw’s base. In this photo a layer of cardboard was used under the 3/4” material to obtain the right level.

quickstop5Check that the base of the saw is at the same level as the support base.

quickstop2Secure the cutoff saw to the worktable. Then square up one end of a board and mark it for your proper length to be cut multiple times, creating your set-up board.

Lay the set-up board so the length mark is directly under the blade. Center the support base under the other end. Fasten both 2x scraps down securely to the work table. Leave the 3/4” scrap loose for now.

quickstop3Nick the set-up board with the blade at the length mark. No need to cut it to length, you might have a use for it elsewhere.

quickstop4Keeping the set-up board held securely, flush edges with the 3/4” scrap. Pencil mark the 2x support base.

quickstop9Fasten the 3/4” scrap to the 2x support base at your pencil mark: the end of this board is your stop length.

quickstop8Use a straight cut scrap to flush the 3/4” stop board edge with the board to be cut. Start cutting! If you are cutting angles, just make sure the top of the angle hits the stop block. Otherwise you risk undermining.

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Thanks for stopping by! Be sure to check out our suspension bridge book. Here is the link:

Building a Small Cable Suspension Bridge with the Cable Locking System

Images, diagrams, and text copyright 2013-2017 by Marvin Denmark unless otherwise noted. Please do not copy and post my content anywhere without my permission. Thank you.

Floating Mantel Shelf

cherry treesOur house has posts, beams, and siding made from Douglas fir milled on our property. I decided to employ another kind of wood for a fireplace mantel. Bitter cherry, also called Oregon cherry (Prunus emarginata) is a native tree that popped up in our woods when it was replanted in 1988. I wondered what the grain and color would look like when it was milled. It has an interesting bark, that much I knew.

So I picked a tree I liked and thinned the woods by one cherry tree. I parked it in the barn to dry for about five months, then had it milled to about a five foot 5-1/2″x7″ with bark edge on the 7″ width. mantle-sawmill

As control against splitting, I scored slices on one side in varying depths, the deepest being the middle cut over the tree center at about 1-1/2″ deep. Then I primed the sawn sides and left it to dry, standing up, for about 3 more months.

frontgrain-joint
I was hoping to preserve the bark, so cutting and fitting the corners was tricky. I sanded down the precautionary slices (which were on the bottom) and cut the pieces. I sanded, splined and glued it all together, then applied a clear finish. The bark is threatening to peel, but underneath looks pretty cool so I really don’t care.

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de-barked Oregon cherry

I used a bracket system to install the 35+ pound mantel. I hollowed out two slot holes at 9/16″ depth on the backside that corresponded with metal brackets that screwed to the wall studs.
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Metal straps, which were recessed so that the mantel would fit flush with the wall, were screwed across the hole slots. Taping their location on the mantel top,  I could line them up with the marked brackets.

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finetune
hammer

A bit of hammering with someone else holding on, and the mantel was up.

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I have 3″ metal posts that I had intended to install on either side, not for support just for looks, but for now we’re seeing if we like just having a floating mantel. Eventually there will be a wall sculpture underneath. I’m just waiting for my spousal unit to come up with something…
finish

Thanks for stopping by! Be sure to check out our bridge book if you’re thinking about a DIY suspension bridge. Here is the link: Building a Small Cable Suspension Bridge with the Cable Locking System

Images, diagrams, and text copyright 2016 by Marvin Denmark unless otherwise noted. Please do not copy and post my content anywhere without my permission. Thank you.