Scaling Up the Size of the Yurt – the Beams

Let’s consider the beams for the 20 foot yurt. For the book I used a 4.5/12 slope and for practical reasons I would use it for your project. I’ve walked on many different sloped roofs and on some that couldn’t be walked on without ropes. I can say that you can comfortably walk or work on a roof that is a 4.5/12 slope.

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One thing that you may not immediately notice is that I assign the slope to the beam and not the roof plane. Why do that? If you use the roof plane you subsequently have to calculate the “hip” (that joint that joins the adjacent abutting planes) of the roof structure; i.e. directly over where the beams run. Why make things more complicated? Because the beam’s lengths are determined using a slope calculation, it simplifies your calculations. So now to that calculation.

When you solve for the hypotenuse of your 4.5/12 slope (triangle) you have a 4.5” leg perpendicular to a 12” base leg (level). Both squared (20.25+ 144) gives you 164.25 and the square root of that is 12.816 (your hypotenuse). How does all of this relate to the beam? Two things: first for every foot on the level that the beam travels the beam rises by 4 1/2 inches (so for a theoretical beam of 10 feet the “up” end is 45 inches higher) and second, for every foot traveled horizontally (on the level) the beam’s length increases by X 1.068 (so in our 10 feet run the beam grows to (10 X 1.068) or 10.68’ which is just over 10’-8”.

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So to complete the beam length calculations you have to subtract the skylight ring assembly and add the overhang you want (here beams are assumed to go all the way to the center of the yurt). Both of these are accomplished in the same manner as above.

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For the skylight, take the diagonal of the framing of the skylight ring (a level measurement from one corner to the opposite corner) and then halve that. That is then taken from the beam overall length, after calculating the “sloping” length.

The overhang is a bit different. To make it simple just consider the overhang equal to whatever you extend the beam tail (whatever is hanging past the walls). So, if you wanted a two foot overhang, just extend the beam out two feet (using the slope calculation, of course). This will be close enough for a two foot overhang.
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Pic2Otherwise, if you want a more precise dimension for your overhang you will need to do some more calculations. This requires a bit of trigonometry. It goes like this: Say you want a two foot overhang. This is a two foot projection that is horizontal (level) from the wall and parallel to the wall. Since we know the number of sides we have, we get the number of divisions in the 360 degree circle. That gives us the peak angle for our triangle. We will use 1/2 of that angle (see drawing below). Our long side of the triangle is 2’ (our overhang). So solving for the hypotenuse: recalling our trig formulas: CAH — cosine of the angle = adjacent side divided by the hypotenuse. Solving for H we divided through by A to get H=C/A. Now do the “rise” calculation from above to get the actual beam overhang length. This sounds like a lot of work, but honestly, it’s easier than reading this entire article!

Be sure to get a copy of the book which explains the rest of building a wood-framed panelized yurt. It’s available on Amazon in color paperback, color ebook, and b&w paperback. And hey, if you build a yurt after reading our book, please send photos to share, thanks!

Here are the links to purchase the book:

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, in color

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, black & white

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Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt: the movie

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Robin put together a movie called “How to Build a Yurt in About Five Minutes.” You can view it by clicking here!

If you’re intrigued yet need more information, you can also buy the book in either color or black and white. It’s 176 pages of step-by-step instructions with lots of photos and drawings, and also includes a materials list for a 16-foot yurt:

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Here’s the link to the color version of the book.

Here’s the link to the black and white version of the book.

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt: the book

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We have a book! Actually, we have two books. Links to purchase them are below. Color printing costs were high on a 176 page book, so we also published a black and white version. The price is about 40% less than the color version, and the photos are clear enough to illustrate the task at hand.

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Here are the links:

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, in color

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, black & white

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Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. VII: The Book Proof!

Proof

We received the first proof of our book today! A random page opening revealed some of the details for the wall panel jig. There are 170+ pages of everything you’ll need to know to build and assemble a wood-framed panelized yurt.

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There are a couple of drawings to finalize, and a few photos with explanations to add regarding final details, along with some additions and corrections to do. Then we’ll release the book to the world via Amazon.com.

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Meanwhile, here are the Three Yaketeers, with Jeep the supervisor. “Another job, well done.” — Mr. Natural

 

 

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. VI: Floor Plan, Roof Plan and Materials List

Here is the floor plan for this yurt. People who require more details will benefit by purchasing the book, which will be released in September 2018.

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Here is the roof plan for this yurt.

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And here is the almost complete materials list with prices based on costs in Lane County, Oregon. All of this will be included in the book, along with an illustrated cut-list.

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And last but not least, Robin has been working on the front and back cover for the book. Here’s a peek at how it looks now. We’re hoping to finish the yurt in the next two weeks, and will have an updated photo for the front cover. Thanks for looking, and stay tuned!

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Illustrations copyright ©2018 by Marvin A. Denmark; cover design and photographs copyright ©2018 by Robin Koontz. Please do not share without written permission, thank you!

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. V: The Roof Panels

The yurt roof panels were installed by two baby boomers and three Millennials. It was the perfect crew: everyone figured out what to do after the first panel and we were done in two hours.

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First, I explained the process and went over safety concerns.

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I built a little cart to make this part easier. Robin installed handles which also helped make the panels, more awkward than heavy, easier to maneuver.

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Whoosh goes the panel to the scaffold.

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I nailed up each placed panel while the crew brought up more and secured with spikes.

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The entire crew getting the last panel up!

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And the roof panels are up! Next I’ll insulate between them, add more ice and snow shield, and install the skylight dome.

We are writing a book about the entire process from start to finish so we can share how to build this yurt with anyone who is interested! Stay tuned as we progress, and be sure to watch for news on the book.

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Thanks for stopping by! Photos taken by Marvin Denmark and Robin Koontz.

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. IV: The Rafters

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Once the cable is tightened around the tops of the walls and the ring tower is centered, it’s time for rafters. The ends are now cut for the fascia, and the other ends are invert-cut to fit against the corners of the ring assembly.

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I placed each rafter in a corner, then put Robin on the tower and handed up the first rafter beam.

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She held the beam while I climbed the ladder across from her. Nothing is heavy, but definitely not a job for one person.

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The metal ring and the wood ring behind it were pre-drilled, so a bolt was placed and Robin hammered it in. This secures the rafter beam to the ring. The cable through holes in the rafter ends will tie it all together.

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Looking like a yurt now! Next is the cable, then the roof panels.

We are writing a book about the entire process from start to finish so we can share how to build this yurt with anyone who is interested! Stay tuned as we progress, and be sure to watch for news on the book.

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Thanks for stopping by! Photos taken by Marvin Denmark and Robin Koontz.