Scaling Up the Size of the Yurt

I want to talk about scaling up the size of the yurt. We had considered adding this in the book but decided against it. So I will take you through the process now. The size or diameter of the yurt in the book was 16 feet. Considering the next reasonable size up one might think of a 20-foot diameter. Let’s follow the steps to creating it. The parts that get affected are the foundation, floor panels, wall panels (though not height), beam length, roof panels, and possibly the skylight (size). If you follow this process you can create a yurt of any size (within reason, as loads on the beams become a factor). We begin with the floor plan, which in turn informs us of what the foundation will be.

With a diameter of 20 feet we are looking for the circumference. That is found with the formula C = d X pi (circumference = diameter X 3.1416). C = 62.83185. With this information we can find the number and width of the wall panels. First, for the number of walls, we divide the circumference by 4. Four feet is the “ideal” working dimension for our walls. When we divide we get 15.7. An uneven number or decimal number doesn’t work well for wall layout. We want an even number of walls, so we round up to 16. Now we divide the circumference by 16 to get walls of approximately 3.927 feet or 3 ft – 11 1/8 in. That’s a good workable number.

chordlengthLet’s step back a second. When we divide the circumference of a circle by assigning a number of sides to it not only do we get our floor panel angles at the peak and the base (more on that shortly) but we also get a dimension that makes for an approximate length for the base of the triangle, which will be our wall length. But this dimension is not the true base of the triangle. To get that you would have to use the chord length formula. There are variations on that formula depending on the conditions known. For us it is the simple one: 2 r sin (angle)/2. We have a radius of 10 feet and an angle of 22.5 degrees. 2 (10) sin 11.25 degrees = 3.9018′, or 3 feet – 10-13/16 inches. This is our most correct length for the base of our triangle and the width of our walls.

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The next step is to find the angles involved in making the various panels. We now have 16 sides around this yurt. In recalling our math classes we know there are 360 degrees in a circle. Dividing 360 by 16 will give us 22 1/2 degrees for the peak angle. The sum of the interior angles of a triangle is 180 degrees so that leaves us 157.5 degrees for the base angles. Since the sides are equal, than the angles are equal at 78.75 degrees. Remember, the peak angle for our yurt in the book had 12 sides and thus (360 divided by 12) 30 degrees with base angles of 75 degrees each. Some people may not like dealing with partial angles, seeking more simplicity in their work. So let’s look at this yurt with more sides, but same diameter, say 18. That would give us angles at the peak of 20 degrees and at the base 80 degrees. Using the chord formula above the wall length will be around 3.49 feet long. That will waste about 6 inches of siding plywood for each wall but is still a workable width.

With the information above we can layout the foundation, and we could finalize the math to build the floor panels. We can build the walls also. If we follow the process in the book you will see that not much changes except for the length of floor joists and later the roof framing members. Walls will stay the same height so just a width adjustment is necessary. I should say at this point that you could make the walls taller to any height chosen, which will only effect a later calculation for the placement for the skylight ring and it’s tower height. So feel free to experiment!

Following this information and combining it with what is in the book you should be able to design your own yurt of practically any size. Just remember the larger you go the more need for paying attention to the loads placed on various members.

Next time I will talk about the beams, tower and skylight, and roof panels for a larger yurt.

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Here are the links to purchase the book:

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, in color

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, black & white

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Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt: the movie

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Robin put together a movie called “How to Build a Yurt in About Five Minutes.” You can view it by clicking here!

If you’re intrigued yet need more information, you can also buy the book in either color or black and white. It’s 176 pages of step-by-step instructions with lots of photos and drawings, and also includes a materials list for a 16-foot yurt:

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Here’s the link to the color version of the book.

Here’s the link to the black and white version of the book.

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt: the book

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We have a book! Actually, we have two books. Links to purchase them are below. Color printing costs were high on a 176 page book, so we also published a black and white version. The price is about 40% less than the color version, and the photos are clear enough to illustrate the task at hand.

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Here are the links:

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, in color

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, black & white

yurtbooks

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. VII: The Book Proof!

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We received the first proof of our book today! A random page opening revealed some of the details for the wall panel jig. There are 170+ pages of everything you’ll need to know to build and assemble a wood-framed panelized yurt.

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There are a couple of drawings to finalize, and a few photos with explanations to add regarding final details, along with some additions and corrections to do. Then we’ll release the book to the world via Amazon.com.

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Meanwhile, here are the Three Yaketeers, with Jeep the supervisor. “Another job, well done.” — Mr. Natural

 

 

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. VI: Floor Plan, Roof Plan and Materials List

Here is the floor plan for this yurt. People who require more details will benefit by purchasing the book, which will be released in September 2018.

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Here is the roof plan for this yurt.

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And here is the almost complete materials list with prices based on costs in Lane County, Oregon. All of this will be included in the book, along with an illustrated cut-list.

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And last but not least, Robin has been working on the front and back cover for the book. Here’s a peek at how it looks now. We’re hoping to finish the yurt in the next two weeks, and will have an updated photo for the front cover. Thanks for looking, and stay tuned!

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Illustrations copyright ©2018 by Marvin A. Denmark; cover design and photographs copyright ©2018 by Robin Koontz. Please do not share without written permission, thank you!

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt, Pt. V: The Roof Panels

The yurt roof panels were installed by two baby boomers and three Millennials. It was the perfect crew: everyone figured out what to do after the first panel and we were done in two hours.

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First, I explained the process and went over safety concerns.

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I built a little cart to make this part easier. Robin installed handles which also helped make the panels, more awkward than heavy, easier to maneuver.

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Whoosh goes the panel to the scaffold.

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I nailed up each placed panel while the crew brought up more and secured with spikes.

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The entire crew getting the last panel up!

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And the roof panels are up! Next I’ll insulate between them, add more ice and snow shield, and install the skylight dome.

We are writing a book about the entire process from start to finish so we can share how to build this yurt with anyone who is interested! Stay tuned as we progress, and be sure to watch for news on the book.

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Thanks for stopping by! Photos taken by Marvin Denmark and Robin Koontz.

Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt

When most people hear the word “yurt,” they think of one of these.

Nomadic tents known as Yurt at the Issyk Kul Lake, Kyrgyzstan

Or maybe one of these.

Yaks in the plains of Mongolia

While it’s true that most yurts are constructed with wood framing (or sticks) and covered with animal skins (like yak) and/or canvas, a more solidly built yurt is also a traditional building design, such as this one.

Wooden Mongolian yurt

I built and/or consulted on several wood-panelized yurts of various sizes in the years before I retired in 2011. I decided that a fun retirement project would be to build my own version of a wood-framed panelized yurt on our property. Here’s one of the yurts I built in recent years, with help from a team of strong arms. Mine is a similar design.

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Yurt under construction near Eugene, Oregon

For my yurt, I began by building a foundation.

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Then I built 12 floor panels.

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Then I built 12 wall panels.

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Then I built 12 roof panels.

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I cut and finished 12 rafters.

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I constructed a huge wooden ring, which houses the skylight dome. All of this work spanned many months, between other projects. But with all the pieces done, it was time to put it all together.

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This week, our neighbor came over to help install the floor panels. It took us about an hour.

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The walls are next, and then the wall cable, and then the tower….well, there are a few steps to get to completion, and it will take however long it takes. I will keep you posted.

And FYI, we are writing a book about the entire process so we can share how to build this yurt with anyone who is interested! Stay tuned as we progress, and be sure to watch for news on the book. Here is the tentative cover, designed by Robin Koontz. That’s a yurt that I built in Florence, Oregon.

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Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt
by Marvin Denmark and Robin Koontz
ISBN-13: 978-0692957370
ISBN-10: 0692957375

Thanks for stopping by! The first three photos are owned by istock.com, the rest were taken by Robin Koontz. Cover design by Robin Koontz, copyright 2017.