Lichen and Moss, Green but not always Mean

What’s that green stuff? People, including house inspectors, don’t like to see anything green on house siding, decking or roofing. As we learned last year, even the FHA has a hissy fit over the color green, and will demand eradication, cleaning and painting, even if the green stuff is not damaging anything.
lichen-HouseIn our case, our 35-year-old house’s cedar siding had a few areas with tiny little hairy lichens happily blowing in the breeze along with a few patches of algae. There were no signs of damage after three and a half decades.

But even though the FHA regulations clearly stated that cedar siding was exempt from the rules regarding wood siding, we still had to provide the funds to pressure-wash and stain the house before we could sell it.

The deed was done and the sale went through. We just hope they were careful, as pressure-washing can be much harder on cedar siding than any amount of lichen.

Lichens are a “plantlike” hybrid of fungus and algae that grow all over the world. The self-sufficient stuff can flourish anywhere as long as it gets a little bit of moisture on occasion. It doesn’t retain much of that moisture and it doesn’t take root, making it easy to remove and control. Lichens don’t bother trees and shrubs unless their growth blocks light to the leaves. But people freak out about lichens anyway.

Moss, on the other hand, is a real plant, and even though anything green growing on a roof is often called moss, this is the real bad guy. Mosses are generally found in shady, wet places. That’s why we see mosses in the woods, especially in wetter climates such as western Oregon. We also see them on roofs, decks, and other structures where debris and water can collect and provide a foothold for it to grow and spread. Mosses break down whatever they attach to, providing a surface cover and moist soil environment for other plants. It’s great stuff, but not if it’s chomping on your house or your bridge!

This is one of our small trail bridges, in sad need of a good cleaning. It is obviously located deep in the woods, and is victim to leaves, fir needles, vines, sticks, and of course, moss.

My spousal unit came up with an easy way to clean the leaves and other debris that collect on all our bridges. A long-handled squeegee for washing windows makes quick work of the task. But alas, this bridge decking has been adopted by moss mostly because of our neglect. For now, we plan to carefully chip the rest of the green stuff away with a knife, as the decking appears to be secure enough for another year or two anyway.

The under-structure is pressure-treated and so far oblivious to the spongy, green, wood sucking plant. Lichen would have been welcome!










Thanks for stopping by! Be sure to check out our bridge book. It includes some cool ideas that apply to other projects, like how to put a really tall post into a deep hole when you aren’t that tall. Amazon has the book on sale for about $13.00 right now. Here is the link: Building a Small Cable Suspension Bridge with the Cable Locking System
Images, diagrams, and text copyright 2015 by Marvin Denmark unless otherwise noted. Please do not copy and post my content anywhere without my permission. Thank you.

Photographic Journaling

I’m not exactly someone who keeps a formal journal, but I keep a lot of records. They are for reference or just as a way to look back and remember what I did that day, that month, that year.

One of the many helpful advantages of digital photography is the ability to take and store photographic records. It’s easy and virtually free, once you have the device, to document and store the process for any project. Publishing the book Building a Small Cable Suspension Bridge was an afterthought after I finished building my bridge, but luckily my spousal unit had recorded most of the steps, using our first digital camera. That old beast used 3-1/2 inch floppy disks (remember those?) and the photos were low resolution. But with some computer magic, we had enough photos to chronicle the steps I used to construct the bridge. Many photos were taken just for fun and our own life journal, but others were for reference.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASince my first bridge was a “Golden Gate” style suspension bridge, the stringers were of varying lengths with obvious repeats on each side. I installed the connection “eyes” to the stringers and organized them using a numbering system. That way, when I attached them to the two main cables, it was an easy chore to sort and install, using cable clamps.

I assembled everything on dry land. Then I just attached the two cables (with stringers attached) to the four posts. I could then easily install the cable locking system components and the decking.
My more recent project is our house. I put in a lot of blocking so that there were plenty of places to connect cabinets, towel racks, grab bars, whatever. Then I photographed all the walls before covering them. That way, when it was time to hang cabinets, I referred back to the photos to recall just where I put the blocking.

This photo shows the backside of the kitchen wall with blocking for the cabinets. My only regret was that I didn’t write exactly how far the blocks were from the ceiling or floor – large lettering would be easy to read in a photo – but I was able to locate them pretty accurately using my electrical boxes for reference.


Thanks for stopping by! If you want more information about my bridge, you can view a video and also read through the archives of this blog. If that’s not enough, be sure to buy my book! Here is the link:

Building a Small Cable Suspension Bridge with the Cable Locking System

Images, diagrams, and text copyright 2013-2014 by Marvin Denmark unless otherwise noted. Please do not copy and post my content anywhere without my permission. Thank you.